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Law Tips: Trying Cases in a World of Media Overload: Adapting to the Audience’s Expectations.

Welcome back to our Law Tips discussion by Tony Paganelli on issues a trial lawyer can encounter in today’s world of media overload. Last week Tony provided pointers on preparing your client for the litigation process. (If you missed that article, it’s below.) In this week’s blog he takes the case to the judge and jury. Mr. Paganelli believes that even though TV and movies create an image removed from real life litigation, there are ways a trial lawyer can adapt successfully in the courtroom. I’m pleased to provide to our Law Tips readers his insights on adapting to the audience’s expectations:

Although a lawyer can (hopefully) communicate in advance with a client in such a way as to condition him or her to understand that lawsuits in real life are far removed from what they see in the movies or on TV, a lawyer has no such opportunity with a judge or jury. To a large extent, a lawyer must adapt to meet those expectations as much as possible in hopes of winning a case. Put simply, Johnnie Cochran and the cast of CSI have ruined it for the rest of us. Fortunately, there are many ways to create a polished and sophisticated impression without breaking the bank or distracting from the message that you want to convey on your client’s behalf. The two main areas where these issues come into play are courtroom visuals and “theatrical” performances of counsel.

First, lawyers must decide whether theirs is a case that lends itself well to multimedia presentations, and whether their judge and courtroom are good candidates for such presentations. If the answers to these questions are “yes,” then it is worth considering using these tools to enhance a courtroom performance.

While certain courtroom animations and computerized visual effects can be cost-prohibitive for many lawyers, and in addition to being complicated to use in a courtroom and temperamental to the point of being unreliable, recent advances in technology have made impressive-looking presentations both easier to use and less expensive than in the recent past. In fact, Microsoft PowerPoint, that staple of meetings and conferences, is both powerful and flexible enough to allow lawyers to quickly and easily create impressive visuals to use in a courtroom, either to project and emphasize exhibits, or to emphasize key points made in oral arguments. Most lawyers already own the software as part of the Microsoft Office suite that they use daily as they run Word, Excel, and Outlook. The hardware is almost equally accessible. Most lawyers either have or can borrow a laptop computer. Similarly, most law firms have a projector and screen and, if not, they can be rented inexpensively or purchased in many cases for a onetime investment of less than $1,000.00. Several books are available to help. Lawyers use these tools to create polished and impressive (and persuasive) visuals, including Cliff Atkinson’s Beyond Bullet Points, Jerry Weissman’s Presenting to Win, Christopher Ritter’s Creating Winning Trial Strategies and Graphics, and Slide:ology by Nancy Duarte.

In the area of courtroom demeanor, the solution is equally achievable. Contrary to popular belief, judges and juries do not expect (or want) lawyers to be blow hards or bullies. Rather, studies show that jurors sympathize with witnesses who are badgered and are put off by arrogant and pretentious trial lawyers. What they want you to show, however, is sincere passion for your client’s case and poised, polished presentation. Standing at counsel table and reading your examination questions or your closing argument in a monotone from your legal pad places you in a stark (and unfavorable) contrast from the actors and actresses they see going through the same motions in the movies, and from the celebrity lawyers whose cases are covered on the news.

Even in an era where jurors have seen hundreds of fictional closing arguments and cross-examinations, their expectations of how a lawyer should act in a courtroom will be met by a well-dressed and groomed (but not flashy) lawyer who appears prepared, organized, and confident, who advocates passionately and confidently (but not obnoxiously) for his or her client’s cause.

Here, like in most aspects of litigation, there is no substitute for simple preparation. A well-prepared lawyer will naturally be confident-and therefore appear confident-as he or she presents a client’s case. Argue with passion and conviction, but don’t pound the table theatrically or turn on the crocodile tears. You won’t be perceived as a movie star, but rather as a bad actor. Put another way, don’t bury your emotions-they can be a powerful tool for communicating your client’s message. But at the same time, don’t manufacture emotions because you think that’s what your audience wants to see. That insincerity will backfire every time.

Movie stars and famous lawyers with unlimited budgets have certainly made it harder for the rest of us to look good in comparison. But with some planning it’s still possible to manage your client’s expectations of what a lawsuit looks like and how a trial lawyer acts so that you won’t fall short in your client’s eyes when your case takes longer than 44 minutes (not counting commercials) to get from first meeting to trial. At the same time, with just a little work you can put on a case that’s (almost) worthy of a Hollywood production without compromising your client’s interests or blowing your litigation budget.

Break a leg!

I want to express our appreciation to Tony Paganelli for his candid advice on real-life trial work in today’s media world. Perhaps you’re interested in the CLE presentation where Mr. Paganelli brings a sharper image to these pointers. There are opportunities for you to hear his presentation from the Federal Civil Practice seminar either as a Video Replay seminar at various locations around the state or as an On Demand seminar, available anywhere, anytime.

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About our Law Tips faculty participant:
Tony Paganelli is the principal of the Paganelli Law Group, Indianapolis. Before leaving to found his own law firm in 2013, Tony was a litigation partner for several years with one of the largest law firms in the United States. Tony is an experienced trial lawyer with nearly 20 years of experience representing people and companies of all sizes in courtrooms across the United States. He also advises businesses on a wide range of issues, including employee relations, contracts and transactions, regulatory compliance, and intellectual property issues.

About our Law Tips blogger:
Nancy Hurley has long-standing connections with Indiana lawyers. She was formerly a member of the ISBA and IBF staffs for over 30 years. Nancy’s latest lifestyle venture is with ICLEF. We are utilizing her exceptional writing and interviewing skills while exploring how her Indiana-lawyer background fits with ICLEF’s needs. When she isn’t ferreting out new topics for Law Tips, her work can be found in our Speaker Spotlight blogs, postings on the ICLEF Facebook and Twitter pages, and other places her legal experience lends itself.

Thank you for reading Law Tips. You may subscribe to this weekly blog through the RSS link at the top of this page.  Also, you are encouraged to comment below or email Nancy. She welcomes your input as she continues to sift through the treasure trove of knowledge of our CLE faculty to share with you.

ICLEF • Indiana Continuing Legal Education Forum, Indianapolis, IN

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Law Tips: Trying Cases in a World of Media Overload: “Why Can’t You Be More Like Tom Cruise or Johnnie Cochran?”

What’s a good way for a lawyer to address the client who complains that she is being too nice to the opposing counsel?   Is there any way to explain the process of litigation before possible disappointments develop? Our faculty participant, Tony Paganelli, Paganelli Law Group, Indianapolis, discusses these and other related issues that are growing more common in his CLE presentation: “Trying Cases in a World of Media Overload.” He has agreed to share with Law Tips readers a sampling of his insights from over 20 years as a trial lawyer:

More often than not, lawyering is the art of managing expectations-those of your clients and those of the courts. Because much of what we do as lawyers goes on behind the scenes, our clients only real glimpses into what we do every day comes from meetings, conference calls, depositions, and increasingly infrequent court appearances where clients actually attend in person. In our age of 24/7 television and always-on internet, the popular media replaces meaningful interaction between attorney and client to form the world’s perception of what we do and how we do it. This is not a good thing. Almost universally, the public’s perception of dispute resolution, as presented by movies, television shows, and the media, is one of a system that is much faster, flashier, and more simplistic than what really goes on in a lawyer’s day-to-day practice of law. This makes lawyers’ lives much more difficult.

For example, depending on the type of case and the venue, lawsuits can take from one to three years to make their way through the court system. During this period, months often go by with little or no activity. Under normal circumstances, clients would have a difficult time understanding this “hurry up and wait” system of project management, but when they see cases proceeding from start to finish in the course of a two-hour movie, or even a sixty-minute television show (with commercials!), they sometimes blame their lawyers for mismanagement, procrastination, laziness, or all of the above.

Similarly, the trials the public sees on the news and in movies apparently involve parties with infinite litigation budgets, especially when it comes to expert witnesses and courtroom presentation tools. After the O.J. Simpson trial, which much of America watched on television in real-time, people came to expect reconstruction videos, computer animation, and endless parades of forensic expert witnesses. What the public does not see are the bills that come afterward. Estimates place the fees incurred by Mr. Simpson in his case almost 20 years ago at well over $10 million.

The public also expects cases to resolve in dramatic courtroom clashes as lawsuits move quickly toward a speedy trial. This is to be expected-cross examination makes for much more dramatic television than a 10-hour long mediation, even though well over 90 percent of lawsuits are resolved by settlement or pre-trial motion, rather than trial. News accounts only cover settlements to the extent that they are announced in press releases or news conferences that are often ignored. The riveting news coverage is in the form of courtroom testimony, and even that is highly edited to focus only on the 30 seconds of dramatic sound-bite each day in ten hours of otherwise undramatic testimony.

The result for real-world litigants is an anticlimax: parties sometimes feel they have been denied their “day in court” or, worse, that their lawyer has “sold them out” by encouraging them to take a quick settlement instead of putting in the work needed to try a case. Similarly, clients accustomed to the “lawyer as gladiator” image presented in movies and television shows are unimpressed by (and sometimes suspicious of) lawyers they perceive as being too friendly with their opposing counsel, and by depositions or cross-examinations that seem tedious, weak, and emotionless.

The Solutions: Managing Your Clients’ Expectations
As in many things, the magic bullet to bridge the expectations gap between fiction and reality is communication. Lawyers should talk with their clients early and often about what should be expected in the course of a lawsuit. The three most important areas in which to set and manage client expectations are time, money, and resolution.

First, at the outset of a lawsuit lawyers should help clients understand how cases make their way through the courts to resolution, and that lawsuits are resolved by settlements an overwhelming majority of the time. At the same time, lawyers should explain that lawsuits typically proceed in fits and starts, punctuated by periods of intense activity followed by lulls that can last months. One effective tool to help lawyers communicate this aspect of litigation to clients, and also to help lawyers manage their cases, is the simple timeline. A printed timeline, provided to a client at the beginning of a case, can be a powerful tool for managing clients’ expectations and conditioning them to the fact that lawsuits are marathons, not sprints. The timeline can also serve as an agenda for periodic status update meetings and calls.

Second, another part of a lawyer’s case management job is to make sure his or her clients understand that everything in a lawsuit costs money. From expert witnesses to jury consultants to accident reconstructionists, the people who add the “sizzle” to a lawyer’s trial presentation are expensive. Any budget that a lawyer prepares for a client must account for these costs and explain to the client that they are not included in the lawyer’s fee, if that is the case. Again, if you can project expenses onto the timeline, your client can see not just how much money the case will cost, but also when (and why) fees and costs will be incurred.

Finally, clients must understand that lawyers are not gladiators. As all good lawyers know, yelling and bullying are seldom the most effective tools for advocacy. However, this may be the most difficult misperception to overcome but the concept of “you’ll be hearing from my lawyer!” is so deeply ingrained into our collective psyche. People expect, and pay, their lawyers to fight their battles for them, so they want to see at least a little bit of hand-to-hand combat on their behalf.

Make no mistake, there is a time and a place for firm, aggressive conduct. The reluctant, dishonest witness must be dealt with and the foot-dragging opposing counsel must be held to task. A lawyer arguing his or her client’s case in a courtroom should not merely read notes from a legal pad, but should plead the client’s case with appropriate passion and zeal. But there is no place in litigation for belligerence, bullying, or needless antagonism. Indeed, judges are becoming increasingly unforgiving of such conduct, insisting on civility from all counsel and litigants.

So how does the lawyer explain himself to the client who complains that he is being too nice to the opposing counsel? How does she respond when the client asks why she didn’t get tougher in the deposition? Again, the answer comes from communicating with your client in advance and setting reasonable client expectations. For example, if you worry that your client will perceive you as weak if you agree to routine continuances and extensions of deadlines, during your first discussion of the lawsuit timeline you can explain that it is typical for both sides (and the court) to need more time to respond to a request or a motion, and that events are often rescheduled through no sinister motive, but rather just because the process of a lawsuit is dynamic. Evidence gets discovered, motions get filed, and other things happen that can’t be predicted in advance. Explain that you might need a continuance or extension yourself at some point, and objecting to the other side’s request may haunt you later when you need the same courtesy.

Moreover, you can explain to your client that objecting to routine and reasonable requests to adjust the timeline will be counterproductive because they will likely be granted over your objection, and you will look petty and unreasonable to the judge for making the objection.

By the same token, explaining to your client in advance, for example, that depositions are fact-finding interviews, and not opportunities to embarrass or belittle opposing witnesses, might help your client understand a seemingly meek questioning technique. A client who knows in advance that the goal of a deposition is to put a witness at ease and encourage him to talk will be satisfied with something less than an inquisition.

Are your client communication methods similar to these? Are you now thinking of a few improvements? Hopefully, this review had a tip or two to help you in the future. I appreciate Tony Paganelli sharing his experience on managing clients’ expectations. And, there’s more!   His timely advice continues next week here on Law Tips when he steps into “Adapting to the Audience’s Expectations.” Come back to see what he has to say about how to create a polished and sophisticated impression without breaking the bank or distracting from the message.

Meanwhile, there are opportunities for you to hear Mr. Paganelli’s presentation from the Federal Civil Practice seminar either as a Video Replay seminar at various locations around the state or as an On Demand seminar, available anywhere, anytime.

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About our Law Tips faculty participant:
Tony Paganelli is the principal of the Paganelli Law Group, Indianapolis. Before leaving to found his own law firm in 2013, Tony was a litigation partner for several years with one of the largest law firms in the United States. Tony is an experienced trial lawyer with nearly 20 years of experience representing people and companies of all sizes in courtrooms across the United States. He also advises businesses on a wide range of issues, including employee relations, contracts and transactions, regulatory compliance, and intellectual property issues.

About our Law Tips blogger:
Nancy Hurley has long-standing connections with Indiana lawyers. She was formerly a member of the ISBA and IBF staffs for over 30 years. Nancy’s latest lifestyle venture is with ICLEF. We are utilizing her exceptional writing and interviewing skills while exploring how her Indiana-lawyer background fits with ICLEF’s needs. When she isn’t ferreting out new topics for Law Tips, her work can be found in our Speaker Spotlight blogs, postings on the ICLEF Facebook and Twitter pages, and other places her legal experience lends itself.

Thank you for reading Law Tips. You may subscribe to this weekly blog through the RSS link at the top of this page.  Also, you are encouraged to comment below or email Nancy. She welcomes your input as she continues to sift through the treasure trove of knowledge of our CLE faculty to share with you.

ICLEF • Indiana Continuing Legal Education Forum, Indianapolis, IN

Posted in Law Blogs, Law Tips0 Comments

Law Tips: 13 Pointers for Improving Your Practice and Keeping Happy Clients!

What competent attorney doesn’t have a goal of “improving your practice and keeping happy clients?” This is an ongoing activity that can always benefit from reminders. With those thoughts in mind, I am happy to have the input of a veteran member of ICLEF’s faculty for the 12th Annual Family Law Institute in this week’s Law Tips. J. David Roellgen is a partner with Kolb Roellgen & Kirchoff LLP, Vincennes, Indiana, who has practiced Family Law for over 33 years. He offers a list of pointers that might bear reviewing by all practitioners, regardless of your practice area.

1. Make sure that you have a full and frank discussion with your client so that expectations can be set and appropriately managed from the beginning. There is nothing less fun than finding yourself arguing with a client about why the law is a certain way or why that is not fair in their particular case.

2. Of course, always return phone calls promptly, hopefully in the same day if at all possible. Good communication is key to lawyer and client happiness.

3. The client is in control of the case and if they are prepared to settle with or without your advice, then the case needs to be settled. If your client is rejecting a reasonable offer and wants to go to trial, it is a good idea to have them sign a document acknowledging that they are acting against your advice and that the results at trial may vary.

4. Self evaluation is difficult but client satisfaction surveys may be a way for them to reflect after some distance from the actual tumult of litigation and for you to reflect on ways to improve your practice.

5. Clients should sign retainer agreements that permit withdrawal within the rules of ethics, in the event you are not paid for services.

6. Use the evergreen approach for retainer fees which means that it periodically needs to be replenished.

7. Determining how you will be paid is important at the initial meeting. This could involve loans, mortgages, notes, family or friends who may guarantee payment.

8. If you give clients homework, make sure they actually do it. If they are not filling out initial client intake forms, they are probably not going to do any homework that you assign them. In our firm, we call clients who’ve been unhappy and sought other counsel as “Second Hand Rose.” If they were unhappy with the first series of representatives, it is only a matter of time before they become unhappy with you.

9. Pay attention to the support staff as they are in the trenches and might be able to point out strength and weaknesses that you have become blind to.

10. Know your limitations. If it is an area of law you want to learn, you might want to do that in an academic setting and not at some client’s expense.

11. If the client doesn’t make you feel right about a position, demand, or tactic, trust your gut.

12. After the attorney client relationship has been established, have the client set out goals in the case that will help you understand what is important to the client and also provide early warnings of client expectations or goals that are unreasonable, unlawful or unethical. Once the goals are completed you can meet with the client and go through those on a line by line basis and focus on attainable ones or one that may need to be modified due to unrealistic expectations or the state of the law.

13. It will likely be necessary to revisit these goals as the case progresses and client dictates set in.

Dave Roellgen’s list does include #14, as well. That would be a thorough “End of Case Questionnaire” that space doesn’t allow us to include here.   Among other topics, the questionnaire provides the client with the opportunity to give feedback on whether their expectations of the firm were met, any improvements they might recommend and future legal needs.

I appreciate Dave sharing his “happy clients” guidelines. ICLEF’s 12th Annual Family Law Institute provides additional valuable advice from Dave Roellgen and 22 of his fellow faculty. You may choose to attend this CLE by Video Replay in the coming weeks, or schedule your own session On Demand by Clicking Here. Or, if you prefer to add the seminar manual to your library, Click Here to download.

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About our Law Tips faculty participant:
J. David Roellgen is a partner with Kolb Roellgen & Kirchoff LLP, Vincennes, Indiana. Having enjoyed the practice of law for over 33 years, Dave was educated at Vincennes University, Indiana State University and Indiana University-Indianapolis Law School, JD, cum laude, 1979. He is a past president of the Knox County Bar Association, a member of the Indiana State; Illinois and American Bar Associations; Fellow, Indiana Bar Foundation; Court of Military Appeals; Retired LTC, Indiana Army National Guard, last serving as the Staff Judge Advocate for the 38th INF. DIV. (MECH), and is City Attorney, City of Vincennes, 1992-1995; 2001- 2007; and 2012-present.

About our Law Tips blogger:
Nancy Hurley has long-standing connections with Indiana lawyers. She was formerly a member of the ISBA and IBF staffs for over 30 years. Nancy’s latest lifestyle venture is with ICLEF. We are utilizing her exceptional writing and interviewing skills while exploring how her Indiana-lawyer background fits with ICLEF’s needs. When she isn’t ferreting out new topics for Law Tips, her work can be found in our Speaker Spotlight blogs, postings on the ICLEF Facebook and Twitter pages, and other places her legal experience lends itself.

Thank you for reading Law Tips. You may subscribe to this weekly blog through the RSS link at the top of this page.  Also, you are encouraged to comment below or email Nancy. She welcomes your input as she continues to sift through the treasure trove of knowledge of our CLE faculty to share with you.

ICLEF • Indiana Continuing Legal Education Forum, Indianapolis, IN

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Law Tips: Pro Bono in Indiana 2014 – A Snapshot From An Expert

Are you in the midst of re-examining your pro bono commitments? Or, should you be? Maybe you’ve been wondering about the status of pro bono in Indiana. Fortunately, we have Scott Wylie to provide information on where Indiana’s pro bono path has led and the current state of affairs. Mr. Wylie is presently a plan administrator with the Volunteer Lawyer Program of Southwestern Indiana. He has directly observed the country’s pro bono developments for more than two decades, having also held the position of Director of the Public Law Center in Orange County California for a number of years. Scott is a nationally recognized commentator on attorney pro bono efforts, nonprofit governance, and poverty law. I am pleased to share with Law Tips readers his overview of Pro Bono in Indiana 2014.

Indiana is a deliberative place. We aren’t known for being on the cutting edge and change is something that we look at with a skeptical eye. It is rare that we jump in the pool first, typically waiting until others have tested the waters. Indiana was the last state in the nation to adopt a system of using interest on lawyer trust accounts (commonly referred to as IOLTA) to help fund the provision of legal services to low income residents. Our system, which went into effect in 1998, primarily funds pro bono programs in the state.1 Similarly, we have been cautious in our development of self-help services and clinical programs to address the needs of those for whom the legal aid and pro bono system just can’t fully serve. That cautious beginning served the state very well for a number of years, creating a well-planned, albeit modestly-funded, pro bono delivery system in every jurisdiction of Indiana. Pro Bono Plan Administrators working with the state’s Pro Bono Commission, worked to implement locally-developed pro bono plans to serve low income Hoosiers. These programs in turn often worked closely with other agencies in the delivery system, such as Indiana Legal Services, to maximize representation of the poor. 2 That system, however, is now greatly stressed after years of low interest rates sapping it of resources and high demand created by the Great Recession.

Even with strong programs and partnerships, our legal services delivery system was not able to meet the legal needs of every low income litigant before the Great Recession- not to mention the needs of the near-poor who aren’t served through the pro bono or legal aid system under any circumstance.

Since 2008, the gap has increased rapidly as programs have had to restrict services. To deal with this reality, law school clinics, legal services programs, courts, and each of our pro bono programs have worked to create new delivery models that attempt to meet the needs of clients who can’t otherwise be served through direct representation from our remaining pro bono programs. These litigants often have to navigate the system alone without services, and, while not ideal, these self-help services do address part of the litigants’ needs. They also assist the courts by increasing judicial efficiency and by ensuring more accurate and better prepared pleadings and legal documents when dealing with unrepresented litigants. 3 Court based clinics, law school clinics, and the encouragement of discrete task or limited scope representation have complemented the efforts of courtroom attorneys in increasing access to justice.

Professional Conduct Rule 6.5

Indiana wasn’t the first to undertake such efforts, but the state did ensure that our Rules of Professional Conduct facilitated these new models. Specifically, the courts adopted Rule 6.5 to make it easier for attorneys to provide limited scope and brief advice services at both court-based and nonprofit clinics (often run by law schools or pro bono programs). Perhaps the best known is our annual Talk to a Lawyer program offered each Martin Luther King Day throughout the state. Dozens of other clinics occur each month, some assisting pro se litigants with court forms and others providing guidance on specific subject matters. In all environments, participating volunteer attorneys can provide the service without having to do full conflict of interest checks. Rule 6.5 allows a pro bono attorney in these controlled environments to provide legal information or services to unrepresented litigants unless she specifically recognizes that she or a member of her firm has a conflict. The commentary provided with the rules provide guidance to both attorneys and program developers to ensure these limited scope services are offered in an appropriate manner and that litigants understand the limited nature of the legal relationship.

Professional Conduct Rule 1.2

Further guidance on providing services in these new environments is contained in Rule 1.2, specifically in subsection c, which along with the rule’s commentary specifically allows limited scope services. This method of providing legal services, often times referred to as unbundling, has been a hot topic in legal services for years. Since the framework of the profession’s conduct rules has always been based upon a full representational model, carving out these specific exceptions to allow limited scope services has been instrumental in allowing clinics, hotlines, and other self-help services to join the other tools available to the poor in obtaining legal help. These have become increasingly important tools as pro bono programs have had to limit services due to funding cuts. Attorneys participating in such programs should familiarize themselves with these rules and their commentary and participate only with reputable programs which follow the prescribed procedures for offering such. 4

By adopting new delivery methods and opening new avenues of service, facilitated by the ethics rules discussed above, Indiana continues its efforts to increase access to justice for the most vulnerable residents of the state, even during a time of very limited resources. For information on volunteering in your home jurisdiction, and for what innovative programs are offered in your community, contact your local Pro Bono Plan Administrator. 5

Thank you to Scott Wylie for sharing this Indiana pro bono snapshot. His ICLEF faculty presentation also includes specific instruction on areas such as allocation of authority between client and lawyer, independence from clients’ views and criminal and prohibited transactions. This training session is a portion of the 2014 Indiana Law Update program available currently by Video Replay around the state or as an On Demand Seminars, Click Here to learn more.

Indiana’s pro bono program structure in its entirety is described throughout Rule 6 of the Indiana Rules of Professional Conduct.

1 Historical information on the development of IOLTA programs throughout the country and historical data on Indiana’s IOLTA program can be found at www.nlada.org.

2 Information on pro bono services in Indiana, including information on each of Indiana’s pro bono programs can be found at www.in.gov/judiciary/probono.

3 In 2008, Indiana undertook an extensive survey of the legal needs of low income Hoosiers. The executive summary of that report can be found at the Indiana Legal Services website.

4 Detailed information on pro se assistance programs and limited scope representation can be found at http://www.abanet.org/legalservices/delivery/delunbund.html.

5 Information on pro bono efforts in Indiana, including a list of local Plan Administrators, can be found at www.in.gov/judiciary/probono.

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About our Law Tips faculty participant:
Robert Scott Wylie: Before returning to the Evansville area in 2005, Mr. Wylie spent seventeen years practicing and teaching law in Southern California. He is a nationally recognized commentator on attorney pro bono efforts, nonprofit governance, and poverty law. From 1999 until 2005, Mr. Wylie served as the Associate Dean of Extemal Affairs and held the John Fitz Randolph Director of Clinical Education Chair at Whittier College School of Law. This work was preceded by a seven year stint as Executive Director of the Public Law Center in Orange County California. For over fifteen years, Mr. Wylie has been active with the American Bar Association Center for Pro Bono. Presently, he is the Director of the Vanderburgh Community Foundation and a Plan Administrator with the Volunteer Lawyer Program of Southwestern Indiana. Mr. Wylie serves on the Board of Directors of a variety of charities including the Legal Aid Society of Evansville.

About our Law Tips blogger:
Nancy Hurley has long-standing connections with Indiana lawyers. She was formerly a member of the ISBA and IBF staffs for over 30 years. Nancy’s latest lifestyle venture is with ICLEF. We are utilizing her exceptional writing and interviewing skills while exploring how her Indiana-lawyer background fits with ICLEF’s needs. When she isn’t ferreting out new topics for Law Tips, her work can be found in our Speaker Spotlight blogs, postings on the ICLEF Facebook and Twitter pages, and other places her legal experience lends itself.

Thank you for reading Law Tips. You may subscribe to this weekly blog through the RSS link at the top of this page.  Also, you are encouraged to comment below or email Nancy. She welcomes your input as she continues to sift through the treasure trove of knowledge of our CLE faculty to share with you.

ICLEF • Indiana Continuing Legal Education Forum, Indianapolis, IN

Posted in Law Tips, News0 Comments